PINK CAMO

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Still somewhat of an enigma, in terms of how useful can pink camouflage be in wartime, is this WWII British Army gas cape. Designed to be worn over the uniform and webbing in the event of a gas attack, it features a shaped backpack ‘hump’ for want of a better word.

VINTAGE JP’s

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Vintage military athletic, or PT shoes are virtually impossible to find. These are a particularly nice US Navy example, and date from the 1940s. The model is virtually the same as the classic Jack Purcell badminton shoe, but with a black rubber sole and trim.

CHALK WHITE

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Off white, not stark or bright, not ivory or buttermilk, just off white, not milk nor cream, the best way to describe it is Chalk White. The pristine colour of those brittle sticks of schooldays that came in card packets reminiscent of cigarette packs. The colour also implies a certain dustiness that chalk gives off, a soft washed texture, pale and powdery.

BIBENDUM Vs STAY PUFT MARSHMALLOW MAN

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A cross between the Ghostbusters Stay Puft Marshmallow Man (RIP Harold Ramis) and Michelin’s Bibendum, the much scarier of the two to those familiar with William Gibson’s pattern recognition. These are in fact Air Ministry survival suits for British pilots, and are kapok filled for both warmth and buoyancy.

MASLAND REVISITED

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As a follow on to our piece about American carpet manufacturer turned hunting apparel makers C. H. Masland of Pennsylvania, we’d like to share some recent additions. Unlike other outdoor clothing companies, Masland came to it relatively late, and almost by accident. They had a wartime contract for canvases, clothing and tent awnings, but their main business had always been carpet manufacturing.

THE ‘BEACH BOYS’ – 1st BEACH BATTALION

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This US Navy Mackinaw coat has ‘1st Beach Battalion’ stencil stamped on it’s lining – The Beach Battalions being the crack-units which stormed the beaches first, and then controlled the traffic of their ‘pop-up ports’ making it possible for the allies to advance inland – most notably on the beaches of Southern France in 1944. Oddly, there is virtually no official documentation recording the activity and accomplishments of the WWII Beach Battalions. A website, created and maintained by a few surviving members of the battalion, aims at it’s least, to make sure a semi-documented account of activities and achievements reserves it’s place in history. – www.1stbeachbattalion.org

“…but the landings were made and the beachheads established because the men of the “Immortal First” refused to accept temporary setbacks or defeat. When the first wave roared ashore and the boat ramps dropped our battalion was there. And got the job done. Not always according to the book. But done and done well.”

THE ARROW POINTS THE WAY

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Kicking off our final boots triptych, here is something for the ladies. A pair of womens ATS ( Auxiliary Territorial Service) pebble grain short lace up boots, featuring the distinctive War Department Broad Arrow, or ‘Crows Foot’, stitched into the toe. Very similar in style to our Broad Arrow’d John White boots dated 1941, these have no discernible makers name, but are War Department stamped at the ankle.

THE AXEMAN COMETH…

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Less Harry Hope’s Greenwich village flea-pit booze can and more The Vikings x Seven Samurai. This new addition to the archive is a hardcore piece. Deadstock cotton canvas shell with leather belt fastening, comes complete with original cutters tag and stencil bearing the legend “Cape Axeman 1942” with distinctive War Department broad arrow – the wearer of which would not be someone you would want to meet on a dark night axe in hand…

ATP / SEDITIONARIES

Jacket's, Jungle 1945. This British Army womens WWII jungle shirt is eerily reminiscent of the McLaren Westwood 'Seditionaries' parachute shirt, even down to the rubber buttons. The belt looped through the epaulette, the removable sleeves, and the stamped 'GAS FLAP' all add to it's Punk...

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