ALIEN SPACE INVADERS

Or, the funny little patterns that emerge in old Indian blankets if you stare at them long enough. A colourful cornucopia of squares, crosses, zig-zags, and triangles in bold graduated colourways that make these so graphically appealing, and sometimes mesmeric.

Virtually a Ralph trademark for years, others are now latching on to their beauty, and they still provide inspiration for many designers, even Dr Martens have recently collaborated with Pendleton Woolen Mills.

ROLEX EXPLORER ‘SHAKEN NOT STIRRED’

The Rolex Explorer is significant in the world of wristwatches. It’s pared down simplicity hides it’s unique design details; the clean readable dial, no date indicator, ‘Mercedes’ style hands, Arabic numerals and markers, the 36mm case, non-hacking* movement and 18,000 beats per hour.

ATP / SEDITIONARIES

Jacket's, Jungle 1945. This British Army womens WWII jungle shirt is eerily reminiscent of the McLaren Westwood 'Seditionaries' parachute shirt, even down to the rubber buttons. The belt looped through the epaulette, the removable sleeves, and the stamped 'GAS FLAP' all add to it's Punk...

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PHOTOS OF OUR BOOK BY THE PHOTOGRAPHER OF OUR BOOK

Here are a few snaps of our limited edition cover edition book by photographer Nic Shonfeld, whom we commissioned to shoot the book for us. Nic has been working closely with us for over a couple of years now and we think the images in the publication are a credit to his understanding of ‘us’ and what we ‘do’ within our industry. You can see more of Nic’s photos on his website here: nicshonfeld.com

VOL 1

We had the launch party for the first volume of SHOWROOM, our new publication, at the shop on Monday evening. All the bods, Beats, art folk, family and friends attended, thanks to all for coming and helping to make the magazine what it is.

BUM FREEZERS

Worthy of closer inspection are these two Dunn & Co. suits from the early 1960s, which are prime examples of the ‘bum freezer’ style, so called because of their shorter silhouette. These are a very British interpretation of Continental styles, particularly Italian, of the late 50s and early 60s, that helped form the basis of the modernist, or ‘mod’ look.