PINK CAMO

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Still somewhat of an enigma, in terms of how useful can pink camouflage be in wartime, is this WWII British Army gas cape. Designed to be worn over the uniform and webbing in the event of a gas attack, it features a shaped backpack ‘hump’ for want of a better word.

1937 BIG TOE.

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Acquired from an old Kent cobblers (est 1908 and now sadly closed down), these bespoke ‘big toes’ where made for a customer of whom never returned to collect. If you’re out there, get in touch!

SILVER FACTORY

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Industrial factory glitter glamour baroque pop underground Andy Edie Gerard silver balloons Campbell’s soup Elvis space-age safety protective plastic people crackle tin foil Velvet fire proof fabric. All in one amazing piece is such a thing possible?

THE ‘BEACH BOYS’ – 1st BEACH BATTALION

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This US Navy Mackinaw coat has ‘1st Beach Battalion’ stencil stamped on it’s lining – The Beach Battalions being the crack-units which stormed the beaches first, and then controlled the traffic of their ‘pop-up ports’ making it possible for the allies to advance inland – most notably on the beaches of Southern France in 1944. Oddly, there is virtually no official documentation recording the activity and accomplishments of the WWII Beach Battalions. A website, created and maintained by a few surviving members of the battalion, aims at it’s least, to make sure a semi-documented account of activities and achievements reserves it’s place in history. – www.1stbeachbattalion.org

“…but the landings were made and the beachheads established because the men of the “Immortal First” refused to accept temporary setbacks or defeat. When the first wave roared ashore and the boat ramps dropped our battalion was there. And got the job done. Not always according to the book. But done and done well.”

SIEBE GORMAN & CO SUBMARINE ENGINEERS

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In 1837 Augustus Siebe, German born but living in England, developed a Diving Helmet which sealed airtight to a rubber suit. The closed suit connected to an air pump on the surface and thus became the first effective standard diving wear of its time. Rewarding Siebe with the moniker “father of deep sea diving”.